San Jose Post Record
Saturday, June 15, 2024
GUEST COLUMNS

Thursday, June 13, 2024

The jury in New York made clear that no one, not even a former president, is above the law.
In "1984," George Orwell's novel about a dystopian future, he describes "newspeak," a propagandistic language of euphemisms and inversions used by officialdom to mask the reality of their meaning.
California has a rich and complex history. With that, comes a responsibility to acknowledge and address the painful legacy of slavery.
Uber on Monday lost its long-running attempt to overturn a California law that would require it to provide employment rights to its drivers and delivery workers.

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

Imagine growing up in a home where tap water consistently runs a stomach-churning brown, sometimes with an odor.
One year after Gov. Gavin Newsom proposed changing the U.S. Constitution to place new restrictions on gun ownership, no other states have joined his campaign for a 28th amendment.

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

Students at Sacramento's McClatchy High School learned last month that if officialdom feels uncomfortable, it will trample on free speech.

Monday, June 10, 2024

Many adults in California are missing out on financial aid for college — and for years, the state declined to help.

Friday, June 7, 2024

It's the billion-dollar question. That's how much cities and other local governments have been receiving from the state each year to deal with California's ever-increasing population of homeless people.
As Dr. Rishi Patel's street medicine van bounces over dirt roads and empty fields in rural Kern County, he's looking for a particular patient he knows is overdue for her shot.
President Biden's long-predicted executive actions restricting asylum claims at the U.S.-Mexico border were expected to take effect at midnight Tuesday in remote parts of California where some migrants gather in open-air camps to await federal processing.

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

The average age of active attorneys in California is 50, and more than 16% are over 65. This "silver tsunami" of baby boomer lawyers will increase the risk of age-related impairment and insufficient preparation for transitioning away from practice.
The man who would finally break up California is a real estate developer from Rancho Cucamonga.
Nearly 3.7 million students and 667,000 newborns in California have money invested in a savings account to help pay for college. But most families don't know the money is there.

Tuesday, June 4, 2024

California's utilities regulator on Thursday adopted new rules for community solar projects, despite warnings from clean energy advocates that the move will actually undercut efforts to expand solar power options for low-income customers.
Self-regulation is a messy business. In politics, it can seem elusive.

Monday, June 3, 2024

Self-regulation is a messy business. In politics, it can seem elusive.

Tuesday, May 28, 2024

Seven years ago, California's Supreme Court declared broad support for the historic right of voters to make law through the initiative process.
In March 2023, Gov. Gavin Newsom stood before a crowd in Sacramento's Cal Expo event center and made a promise: He'd send 1,200 tiny homes to shelter homeless residents in the capital city and three other places throughout the state.

Friday, May 24, 2024

When Gov. Gavin Newsom unveiled a much-revised 2024-25 state budget this month, he became visibly irritated when reporters pressed him about raising taxes to cover a $44.9 billion deficit, particularly the corporate tax hikes that left-leaning groups have suggested to avoid spending cuts in health, welfare and education programs.
Based on their line of questioning, California Supreme Court justices seemed to be reaching for a compromise as they heard oral arguments Tuesday in the long-running legal saga over whether gig workers should be considered independent contractors or employees.
Special interest groups spent more than $114 million to lobby California officials and legislators in the first quarter of this year, matching the pace last year when a record $480 million was spent to influence state policy decisions.
Few places in California are as unforgiving for driving an electric car as the remote and sparsely populated Imperial Valley.

Thursday, May 23, 2024

Homelessness gets top billing in a measure likely to make it onto your November ballot. Whether the measure has anything to do with homelessness is debatable.

Tuesday, May 21, 2024

As Gov. Gavin Newsom and state legislators spend the next few weeks fashioning a state budget that's plagued by a multibillion-dollar deficit, they can't count on a booming economy to make their task easier.

Monday, May 20, 2024

Gov. Gavin Newsom faces a huge deficit this spring, and he has one especially big money-saving option that he's not using.
In January, the University of California Board of Regents broke the hearts of undocumented students by halting a proposal to allow them to work on campus. A few days later, David Alvarez had a plan. The Democratic assemblymember from Chula Vista huddled with student organizers and decided to draft a bill to compel the UC, as well as the community colleges and California State University, to do what the UC regents would not.

Thursday, May 16, 2024

Just minutes after Gov. Gavin Newsom unveiled a revised state budget with billions of dollars in spending reductions on Friday, advocates for affected programs began showering reporters with statements of dismay.
Desperate for a way to help the tens of thousands of people living in tents, cars and RVs on California's streets, lawmakers are attempting to upend a key tenet of the state's homelessness policy.
For students struggling with the cost of college, Gov. Gavin Newsom has some bad news: there may be less financial aid this fall.

NEWS

Thursday, June 13, 2024

Silicon Valley Bank imposed "systemic illegal employment practices" on hourly employees, including forcing them to work through meal breaks and failing to reimburse business-related expenses, according to a proposed class action filed in Santa Clara County Superior Court.

Thursday, June 13, 2024

In a move that could create significant legal and procedural complications, Democratic lawmakers in California are considering adding poison pill provisions to several bills aimed at addressing retail theft. These clauses would render the new laws invalid if voters pass a Proposition 47 overhaul this fall.

Thursday, June 13, 2024

Last year, my colleague Tara Siegel Bernard and I wrote a series of articles about banks that shut down the checking accounts of scores of everyday citizens and small businesses. There was often no clear reason, explanation or recourse.

Thursday, June 13, 2024

Johnson & Johnson will pay $700 million over three years to settle claims by 43 state attorneys general, including California, that the pharmaceutical giant's baby powder and other talc-based products are carcinogenic, the company announced.

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

Consider a common scenario: You're driving on the highway, thinking about something that happened at work or what you're going to eat for dinner, and your car starts beeping.

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

Meta Platforms Inc. will get another chance to duck an investor lawsuit filed in the wake of the 2019 Cambridge Analytica scandal as the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to reconsider the appellate court's ruling moving the case forward.

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

A San Francisco judge on Friday expressed doubt that the co-founder of Hippo Enterprises, Inc., an Insurtech company, will be able to prove that he lost at least $15 million in prospective stock sales based on claims that he was deceived into selling some of his stock for a fraction of its value by Hippo's CEO and an executive for one of the company's largest institutional investors' Innovius Capital LLP.

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

A 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel appeared dismissive Monday of arguments by an attorney for Palestinian rights organizations that they had any authority to get involved in the decision by President Joe Biden and administration officials sending military aid to Israel that it claims is aiding and abetting a genocide.

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

The federal judge in San Francisco heading the multidistrict litigation against agricultural giant Monsanto, maker of the allegedly carcinogenic weedkiller Roundup, expressed his concern that a plaintiff firm was overstretched and taking on more cases than it could handle.

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

America is saturated with food trademarks. The Cronut? Trademarked. Pop-Tarts? Trademarked. Even grapes that taste like cotton candy, and the mash-up of gai lan and broccoli called Broccolini are legally protected.

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

From sunrise to sunset, the U.S. Border Patrol buses arrived every hour at a sunbaked parking lot in San Diego.

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Ryan D. Nelson recused himself from a case accusing the Biden administration of enabling genocide in Gaza because he traveled to Israel and met with government officials there.

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

A federal antitrust lawsuit filed Friday in San Francisco accused six major hotel operators and a revenue science firm of acting as horizontal competitors and fixing hotel room rates with the help of a pricing algorithm.

Monday, June 10, 2024

A federal fair-housing law prohibits discrimination in housing based on race, ethnicity, religion and other factors, like gender identity and disability. That applies to any number of scenarios, in which such discrimination has occurred: a homeowner refusing to negotiate a sale; a landlord failing to make repairs; a mortgage lender denying a loan.

Monday, June 10, 2024

A multibillion-dollar antitrust class action against the National Football League over the legality of its "Sunday Ticket" broadcast package opened Thursday to a jury in a courtroom so full it spilled into overflow seating.

Monday, June 10, 2024

The federal judge in San Francisco overseeing consolidated litigation against DNA testing service 23andMe related to a data breach affecting millions of people appointed lead counsel for the plaintiffs, citing several factors including experience with multidistrict proceedings.

Friday, June 7, 2024

Counsel for an Argentinean lawyer, accusing Uber Technologies Inc. of making him the "sacrificial lamb" of a criminal probe related to the company's roll out in his country, warned the California Supreme Court against letting businesses "use a contract as a shield" under the state's economic loss rule during oral arguments Tuesday.

Friday, June 7, 2024

A Yolo County judge has rejected a California Environmental Quality Act lawsuit attempting to block a proposed reservoir north of Sacramento. He also did so quickly — something that has been a rarity in both CEQA and water litigation in the past — in compliance with a recent state law.

Friday, June 7, 2024

The State Bar Office of the Chief Trial Counsel said Wednesday that it had shut down a woman who was practicing law without a license in Livermore.

Friday, June 7, 2024

A San Francisco judge on Wednesday declined to toss claims of elder abuse and punitive damages in a wrongful death lawsuit against Owl, Inc., a medical transportation service, brought by the family of an 88-year-old Army veteran, who perished in a car wreck while an Owl passenger.

Friday, June 7, 2024

In 2023, Americans reported they were the victims of more nearly $10 billion in financial fraud1.

Friday, June 7, 2024

If buying a home is an inexorable part of the American dream, so is the next step: eventually selling that home and using the equity to trade up to something bigger.

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

Borrowers of the popular "buy now, pay later" installment loans should find it easier to dispute charges and get refunds under a new rule announced by the federal government last week.

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

The state Supreme Court, divided 5-2, concluded that a 2021 state law that allows criminal defendants to seek separate trials on gang enhancements can only be applied prospectively.

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

A lawsuit against Ram and Jeep vehicle manufacturer FCA US LLC claiming some of its cars used defeat devices to cheat diesel emission standards will remain in California as a federal judge on Monday denied the company's bid to move the case to Michigan.

Wednesday, June 5, 2024

When a federal bankruptcy judge approved a request for the Diocese of Sacramento to pay "ordinary professionals" during its Chapter 11 proceeding, the first line on the first exhibit was for $10,000 per month to Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc. for "legal advice concerning immigration matters."

Monday, June 3, 2024

A security guard who was fired after he reported misconduct by administration officials at the Redlands Unified School District won a wrongful termination lawsuit and was awarded $800,000.

Monday, June 3, 2024

Popular prebiotic soda brand Poppi, one of the leading nonalcoholic beverages on the market, was accused in a newly filed proposed class action of misleading consumers about the gut health benefits of its products.

Monday, June 3, 2024

LOS ANGELES — For months, Los Angeles residents believed the park had been vacated. Only the memory of P-22, the beloved celebrity mountain lion who had once made it his home, lingered as the city mourned his death. That was until this month, when an apparent successor — another mountain lion, seemingly bigger, younger and stronger — emerged late one night.

Monday, June 3, 2024

Typically quiet Santa Catalina Island, off the coast of Los Angeles, erupted in tumult last fall over a bold proposal to kill all the deer on the island using sharpshooters in helicopters.

Monday, June 3, 2024

When Interstate 25 was constructed through Denver, highway engineers moved a river.

Monday, June 3, 2024

The U.S. economy has been an enigma over the past few years. The job market is booming, and consumers are still spending, which is usually a sign of optimism. But if you ask Americans, many will tell you that they feel bad about the economy and are unhappy about President Joe Biden's economic record.

Tuesday, May 28, 2024

The families of U.S. Marines killed after an aircraft crashed during a training exercise in California are suing its manufacturers, alleging design and production defects caused the deaths. The complaint accuses defendants Bell Textron, The Boeing Co. and Rolls Royce Corp. of failing to disclose aircraft's problems to the U.S. government.

Tuesday, May 28, 2024

The U.S. Department of Justice and 30 attorneys general filed a long-awaited antitrust lawsuit against Live Nation Entertainment Inc. on Thursday, accusing the ticketing giant of acting as a "gatekeeper" for live music events.

Tuesday, May 28, 2024

The state Supreme Court, answering a certified question from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, rejected a bid Thursday by a Berkeley concert promoter to force its insurer to cover losses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Monday, June 10, 2024

UC Berkeley has a free hand to develop student housing on the long-disputed People's Park site south of campus as well as future projects in its long-range development plan, the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

Monday, June 3, 2024

Neutral Craig Karlan understands that flexibility is crucial to reaching a resolution.